Voters Demand Renewed Energy Independence

According to the results of a recent poll overseen by Rasmussen Reports and the Heartland Institute, 82 percent of voters remain concerned about escalating energy and gasoline prices, while 60 percent identify as “very concerned.” Only 14 percent of respondents indicated an absence of concern.

60 percent of likely voters are in favor of a law that would substantially increase the production of oil and gas drilling across the United States, while 47 percent of respondents indicated that they would “strongly favor” a law that promotes American energy independence.

In contrast, 30 percent of respondents indicated that they would be in opposition to legislation promoting more drilling, while 11 percent remained unsure.

Moreover, over half of the respondents agree that the president and Congress need to focus greater attention on drilling for oil and gas in domestic territories in order to alleviate pressure at the pump. However, 34 percent of respondents argue that the White House should focus on the reduction of climate change instead.

In general, men held harsher attitudes towards elected officials, with 56 percent of men believing that the president and Congress should focus more extensively on escalating U.S. energy production in order to reduce significant energy price increases. On the other hand, 48 percent of women felt similarly.

From a political standpoint, the divide is even more significant. Specifically, 74 percent of Republicans and 54 percent of unaffiliated voters believe that energy prices should comprise the central foundation of policy focus. However, 54 percent of Democrats believe that the White House should focus more extensively on the reduction of climate change, rather than relief for American families.

Younger voters demonstrated markedly more concern about climate change relative to older voters, specifically by believing climate change is highly likely to have a catastrophic effect on the planet in the next one hundred years.

A total of 1,004 likely voters in the United States took part in the survey, which took place from April 28 to May 2. The margin of error is +/- 3 percent, and the confidence level is 95 percent.